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Town of Riverhead

 
Stormwater Management


2019 Stormwater Annual Report
2018 Stormwater Annual Report

2017 Stormwater Annual Report

2016 Stormwater Annual Report

2015 Stormwater Annual Report

2014 Stormwater Annual Report

2013 Stormwater Annual Report

2010 Stormwater Annual Report

2009 Stormwater Management Program -  Updated 2012


1.    GENERAL INFORMATION

            a.     Stormwater Management Program

Stormwater is produced every time rain or snow is not absorbed directly into the soil.  Stormwater can pick up oils, litter, sediments, fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, and pathogens as it travels across roads, buildings, dumpsters, lawns, and parking lots.  If this stormwater flows into lakes, streams, and bays, it can be a major source of water pollution.  It is estimated that 79 percent of the water pollution in the United States comes from stormwater and other indirect discharges that are collectively called “nonpoint” sources.

 

In 1972, the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) was adopted to improve the quality of our Nation’s waters.  The Act sought to accomplish this by minimizing and eliminating what are commonly referred to as “point sources” of pollution, sources of pollution that originate from a pipe or other specific point of discharge.

 

The Clean Water Act was amended in 1987 to target the non-point sources of pollution.  Under Phase I of this effort, which began in 1990, municipalities having a population greater than 100,000 people were required to implement programs and projects that would reduce non-point pollution.  In 2003 this requirement was extended to almost all other municipalities including the Town of Riverhead under what is commonly referred to as “Phase II”.

 

In New York, Phase II requires that all regulated municipalities obtain a permit from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation for the discharge of stormwater runoff into their surface waters.  As a condition of this permit, regulated municipalities must develop and implement a comprehensive Stormwater Management program that includes mandated programs and practices in the following six categories:

 

·         Public education and outreach on stormwater impacts

 

·         Public Participation/involvement

 

·         Illicit Discharge detection and elimination

 

·         Construction site stormwater runoff control


·         Post-Construction Stormwater management in new development/redevelopment 

·         Pollution prevention/good housekeeping for municipal operations

 

The Town of Riverhead has filed a Stormwater Management Plan with the NYSDEC that describes what the Town will be doing each year to meet the requirements of the Phase II Stormwater Management program by 2008.  We will be working on revising these documents for submission to the DEC in 2009.

 

The Town of Riverhead constantly works on improving the performance of the Town-owned storm sewer system.  The condition of 72 outfalls which discharge stormwater to local surface waters is periodically checked and controlled to prevent pollution of receiving waters.  These local waters include Flanders Bay, Peconic Bay and River, Meeting House Creek and Terry’s Creek.



Property owners are required to control the discharge of stormwater to the street. This is particularly important during the winter months when Town personnel are required to respond to icing conditions created by sump pump discharges.  Property owners who discharge water to the street and create icing conditions that require salting by the Department may be subject to fines.


For more information, contact the Engineering Department at (631) 727-3200, extension 201.

 

            b.         Catch Basin Cleaning


Annually, the Town of Riverhead cleans approximately 200 of our more than 2,268 catch basins.  If you have reason to believe that a catch basin or a catch basin grate requires cleaning please call our Highway Department at (631) 727-3200, extension 338.  Before doing so please read the Catch Basin Frequently Asked Questions below.


When you call, please be sure to include the following information:

·                     Name

·                     Address

·                     Phone number

·                     Catch basin location


The Highway Department repairs catch basins and manholes on an as-needed basis. If you observe a catch basin or manhole in disrepair (hardware out of alignment or a hole in the asphalt around the perimeter of the structure) please report the condition by calling our Highway Department at (631) 727-3200, extension 338.

 

            c.         Flooding and Drainage

 

If during a rain event you are experiencing flooding please call the Highway Department at (631) 727-3200, extension 338 during normal business hours of operation.  If you do not get an answer during normal hours of operations call the Riverhead Police Department at (631) 727-3200, extension 312.
If you have a general question or comment regarding a flooding or drainage issue please call our Engineering Department at (631) 727-3200, extension 201 during normal hours of operation and we will discuss your concerns.

 

d.         Emergency Sewer Stoppages

 

In the event of a Storm Sewer Stoppage, please call the Highway Department at (631) 727-3200, extension 338, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 7:00 am to 3:30 pm.  After regular business hours, or if no one answers at the above number, call the Riverhead Police Department at (631) 727-3200, extension 312.

 

e.         Frequently Asked Questions – Catch Basins

 

What is an "overflow" or "bubbler" catch basin?

"Overflow" or "bubbler" catch basins are outlet points for an interconnected system of 2 or more catch basins designed to convey runoff water from one area to another in an effective manner. These generally exist where there is no nearby main drainage pipe to which the "overflow" catch basin may be connected. As such they fill up and "overflow" along the curb line to the next drainage system.

 

Why do some catch basins always seem to be clogged or flooding over?

Most likely this is what is referred to as an "overflow" or "bubbler" catch basin though it could be clogged so call the Highway Department at (631) 727-3200, extension 338, Monday through Friday, between the hours of 7:00 am to 3:30 pm.  After regular business hours, or if no one answers at the above number, call the Riverhead Police Department at (631) 727-3200, extension 312.

 

If I see water or debris in a catch basin that is not full or over topping does that mean it's clogged or needs to be cleaned?

Not necessarily.  Many of the Town’s catch basins are what are called "sump" catch basins. This refers to the fact that the outlet pipe that conveys water away from the basin is higher than the bottom of the basin. This design is intended to "catch" solids, sediment and debris below the outlet pipe, in the basin "sump", to be cleared away by our staff. This minimizes the flow of solids and sediment to our waterways and limits the potential for buildup of these same materials in our drainage piping.

2.    ILLICIT DISCHARGE DETECTION AND ELIMINATION
       
a.    General

 

The term “illicit discharge” is defined in EPA’s Phase II storm water regulations as “any discharge to a municipal separate storm sewer that is not composed entirely of Stormwater, except discharges pursuant to a National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit and discharges resulting from fire-fighting activities”.  Illicit discharges can be categorized as either direct or indirect Examples of direct illicit discharges:

·         Sanitary wastewater piping that is directly connected from a home to a storm sewer.

·         Materials (e.g., used motor oil) that have been dumped illegally into a storm drain catch basin

·         A shop floor drain that is connected to the storm sewer

·         A cross connection between the municipal sewer and storm sewer systems.

 

Examples of indirect illicit discharges are:

 

·         An old and damaged sanitary sewer line that is leaking fluids into a cracked storm sewer line

·         A failing septic system that is leaking into a cracked storm sewer line or causing surface discharge into the storm sewer.

 

    b.    Mapping

 

The Town of Riverhead Stormwater Management Office is actively mapping the storm sewer system and during this process have been inspecting storm structures for illicit connections.  Town Code Chapter 109 describes definitions, Town Code and potential violations associated with illicit discharges.

 

The Town of Riverhead Stormwater Management Office invites the residents of Riverhead to call in any suspected illicit discharge violations so that we may investigate the issue.  To report any suspected illicit discharge call 631-727-3200-extension 201.

 

 

Stormwater is produced every time rain or snow is not absorbed directly into the soil.  Stormwater can pick up oils, litter, sediments, fertilizers, pesticides, herbicides, and pathogens as it travels across roads, buildings, dumpsters, lawns, and parking lots.  If this stormwater flows into lakes, streams, and bays, it can be a major source of water pollution.  It is estimated that 79 percent of the water pollution in the United States comes from stormwater and other indirect discharges that are collectively called “nonpoint” sources.

In 1972, the Federal Clean Water Act (CWA) was adopted to improve the quality of our Nation’s waters.  The Act sought to accomplish this by minimizing and eliminating what are commonly referred to as “point sources” of pollution, sources of pollution that originate from a pipe or other specific point of discharge. 

The Clean Water Act was amended in 1987 to target the non-point sources of pollution.  Under Phase I of this effort, which began in 1990, municipalities having a population greater than 100,000 people were required to implement programs and projects that would reduce non-point pollution.  In 2003 this requirement was extended to almost all other municipalities including the Town of Riverhead under what is commonly referred to as “Phase II”.

In New York, Phase II requires that all regulated municipalities obtain a permit from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation for the discharge of stormwater runoff into their surface waters.  As a condition of this permit, regulated municipalities must develop and implement a comprehensive stormwater management program that includes mandated programs and practices in the following six categories:

·         Public education and outreach on stormwater impacts

·         Public Participation/involvement

·         Illicit Discharge detection and elimination

·         Construction site stormwater runoff control

·         Post-Construction Stormwater management in new
     development/redevelopment

·         Pollution prevention/good housekeeping for municipal operations 

The Town of Riverhead has filed a Stormwater Management Plan with the NYSDEC that describes what the Town will be doing each year to meet the requirements of the Phase II Stormwater Management program by 2008.  We will be working on revising these documents for submission to the DEC in 2009.

3.    PERMITS

  1. New York State Department of Environmental Conservation SPDES General Permit for Stormwater Discharges from CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY Permit No. GP-0-08-001
     

4.    PAMPHLETS

  1. Storm Water Pamphlet
  2. Septic Pamphlet
  3. Chapter 110 Info
  4. Canadian Geese
  5. Green Infrastructure
  6. Pathogens
     

5.    WEB LINKS

New York State DEC website

United States Environmental Protection Agency websites

Other sources of information on stormwater management.

§         Center for Watershed Protection

§         Stormwater Manager's Resource Center

§         Nonpoint Education of Municipal Officials by New York Sea Grant

§         The Low Impact Development

§         Natural Resources Defense Council

6.    POSTERS

  1. Animal Waste
  2. Lawn Fertilization
  3. Vehicle Maintenance
  4. Vehicle Cleaning

    Drew Dillingham 
    Town Engineer
    Ext. 604

    Ernesto Rosini
    Deputy Town Engineer
    Ext. 279


    Shannon Clifford

    Principal Office Clerk
    Ext. 296